Something worth celebrate: Coy Mathis

Today is a day worth celebrate because we have made another step forward on the scene of transgender equal rights movement.

Coy Mathis, a six year-old transgender first grader, has been told by her school that she cannot use the girl’s restroom because “as she grew older and developed, some students and parents would likely become uncomfortable”, and that “Coy’s birth certificate stated she was male” even when her recent medical and legal documents acknowledged her identity as a female*, according to today’s New York Times article.

After an investigation since Kathryn Mathis, Coy’s mother, filed a complaint with Colorado Civil Rights Division in February, the Division has ruled in favor of Coy Mathis. It has become the first case ruling in the U.S. that holds that “transgender students be allowed to use bathrooms that match who they are”, said Michael D. Silverman, the executive director of the Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund (where Coy’s story made the homepage of the organization’s website).

Coy (L) and her family. Credit: TLDEF Information

TLDEF’s Homepage Article on Coy’s Winning the Case

*It is mentioned in CCN’s report that “Coy’s passport and state-issued identification recognize her as female.” [x]

To see more reports:

Admin Note: Thanks to Lesley for linking me the article this morning. It was a wonderful thing to wake up to.
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Tebya: Why say something?

While advocating LGBTQ rights, or any human rights in that matter, there’s always the question of “why bother?”. Why not just be gay, be lesbian, be bisexual or be trans and go on with your life? Why vocalizing it and announcing it to the world? Why ‘pride’? Why advocate?

It seems easier to save the trouble; it feels safer to remain silent. Speaking up means exposing yourself, means to take matters into your own hands and putting yourself on the line. Even in California, one of the most LGBTQ friendly states in the U.S., over 78% of transgender individuals have reported being harassed at school, according to National Gay and Lesbian Task Force‘s regional report. Sometimes, speaking up puts you in danger.

But not saying anything is also dangerous.

Not saying anything is breeding ignorance, is allowing the discrimination to continue. Hatred and discrimination doesn’t stop itself. Not saying something against it might be avoiding the confrontation and immediate danger, but it only puts the danger in the future.

Of all the things I fear, ignorance the greatest. People fear the things they don’t understand; fear grows on ignorance, and hate grows on fear.

Saying something is to break the silence, removing the barrier and let conversations happen. It might be intimidating at first, but just like what R says in the movie Warm Bodies: all great changes are a little scary at first.

-Tebe

Why Should Straight People Support Gay Rights?

Have you ever heard of someone saying they got dumped because their partner was gay?

Imagine how it would never happen if gay and straight people are equal so no one felt the need to be in the closet!

How many unnecessary heartbreaks did we just prevent there?

Even better: Gays might get dumped for their partners are closetly straight!!

Revenge!!

p.s. y’know this post is s’posed to be ironic.

p.p.s. but seriously. It’s not gay rights, it’s human rights.

More about Transgender (and more)

How old is it old enough to ‘decide’ whether or not one is transgender? Is gender identity something one could decide? Below are three documentaries of profound stories, about children who started transitioning at a young age.

Josie’s Story

“They’ve made the decision to kill themselves at the age of 12 and 13, that’s a pretty powerful decision. […] If doing nothing is doing harm, you have to do something.” -Dr. Olson

Boys Will Be Girls 20/20 part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4

“You don’t make a decision about your gender identity. It’s not something you decide.” -Dr. Olson

“I knew I was a boy when I was two years old. I think everybody knows what gender they are at a very early age.” -Jackie’s father

“Many people think after you have the [sex reassignment] surgery you are completely happy with your life. No! It’s just you feel complete, you feel at a beginning. Because that’s what other girls have when they are born.” -Kim

Jazz’s Story

“Just because I’m a little different, does not mean I should not have the right to play with my team [girl’s soccer].” -Jazz’s response to her school board rejecting her from playing in the girl’s soccer team